Basketball – No Substitute for Awareness

no-substitute-for-awareness

By Albert J. Battista

There is more to know than just foul or violation. Commonly astute officials might have heard once to have an awareness to what type of offense and defense each team is using. All of which is good, but officials can go deeper with more knowledge about the game and how it changes every few minutes. Two of those deeper understandings are picking up on the personality of each game and the substitution patterns. Knowing each separates the good from the great.

Game personality. We know that individual games have their own personalities. There are conference rivalries, non-conference rivalries, blowout games, games where every possession matters, games that are very chippy, etc. Going into the game, it is helpful to have a sense of what personality the game may take beforehand. If not, you have to identify the game’s personality right away.

For example, Xavier and Cincinnati is an intense rivalry. The crosstown teams know each other, given the universities are within a few miles of each other. Often in these types of match-ups, the game will have started before it actually starts — social media can be used beforehand to stew emotions. In these games, officials need to be aware of dead-ball situations and  an increased likelihood for unsporting behavior.

Conversely, you may be involved in game that is going really well with everyone behaving very sportingly. Then out of the blue someone gets a little excitable on the bench. In those cases it may not be beneficial to immediately issue a technical foul.

In either situation, officials need to know the personality of the game and be aware of the context of the game so they understand when something is out of character for the game. Lacking an understanding of the context of a game and adding fuel to a fire with a technical foul will not help the game. It wakes everyone up and can make the game more challenging for the crew.

Substitutions. As the game goes on, dig deeper to figure out why a substitute is coming in the game. Some reasons a substitute may be coming into the game include: to shoot threes, block shots, play defense, disrupt, give or take a foul, playing time, etc.

Every time a substitution occurs, ask yourself why. Sometimes it may be that the player is in foul trouble. Or it may be the team’s normal substitution pattern for that player to get a rest.

However, be aware of abnormal situations. When a starter leaves the game three minutes into the first quarter (or half) with no fouls, a red flag should go up in your mind.

Throughout the game, be aware of the normal substitution patterns of the teams. Awareness of patterns can allow a better understanding of what may be required of you and your coverage. Know each team’s first player off the bench. Who is the team’s spark plug? Who is the team’s post presence?

Some substitutions to look for:

  • First substitute into the game.
  • Player goes out for foul trouble.
  • Impact substitutions.
  • First substitute of second half.
  • Post player gets substituted with no foul trouble.

The team’s stats help to provide likely scenarios for who and what those players may be. Past experience with a team can also be helpful. In a pregame, discuss who has had the teams before and what they picked up from that previous experience. Who is the key scorer, the key defender, the key substitute, etc. Additionally, know the makeup of the players’ personalities. Is a certain player going to be someone who has a calm head and can be used as an ally or is a player going to be someone who has a hot head and may need more awareness?

Take a situation where a team quickly gets behind, 14-0, and the coach substitutes all five players. Be aware of the psychological makeup of the entire team following that type of substitution. The team may be upset and become increasingly frustrated. No player enjoys being taken out of a game, especially after falling quickly behind. Further, the coach may take the team’s struggles out on the crew. Those are all important context situations for the crew to be aware of and to aid them in carrying out their duties.

A significant substitution situation that crews must pick up on is when a team substitutes out a post player who is not in foul trouble. The team may be trying to pick up the pace of the game, to start running or to start pressing.

Another possibility is the player is a team’s sixth player who is good enough to start but is used as a spark plug off the bench. That can be picked up when you have had a team before.

Others, like former North Carolina coach Dean Smith, played their entire bench in the first half. Coach Smith was believed to have done that to get meaningful experience out of players and to wear the other team down.

Be sure to monitor the beginning and end of the substitution process. Not having the appropriate number of players on the court after a substitution can rear its ugly head for officials. Each crewmember is wise to count the players before resuming play, whether that is a substitution, timeout, quarter break or halftime intermission.

Further, you must know the substitution rules. When a player is replaced, he or she cannot re-enter until the clock has legally started and time has gone off the clock. In order to correctly officiate, know who was subbing in and who the substitutes are.

There is more to awareness than properly judging fouls and violations.

Albert J. Battista, Washington D.C., is a longtime high school and college basketball official, an IAABO rules interpreter and an NBA observer

Basketball – Halfway Home: ‘Let’s Talk’

Imagine that the buzzer to end the first half has just sounded. The game is going to be a real barnburner. The teams are tied at halftime and there is no sign of either team gaining an advantage any time soon. The gym is filled with spectators, and the atmosphere is electric. You can’t wait to start the second half. Now imagine another scenario. The buzzer to end the first half has just sounded. The spread is 20 points at halftime, and the score is much closer than the action on the court suggests. Few fans occupy the seats; most of them seem to be more interested in the concession stand than the game. It could be a long second half.

Undoubtedly you have officiated both types of games. While those two games may seem worlds apart, the fact is that they are not. Both games have one thing in common — the success or failure of the officiating crew depends on what happens in the officials’ locker room during the halftime conference and on the court in the second half.

Every official learns the importance of the pregame conference as one of the foundations of successful officiating. There are even laminated cards that organize all of the items to be addressed in the pregame conference. Postgame analysis receives similar emphasis. Videotape and postgame breakdowns have become very valuable tools to officials.

With the emphasis on pregame and postgame in officiating, one critical point is sometimes overlooked — halftime. While it may be brief, halftime is a crucial point for officials. At halftime, officials are given the opportunity to communicate in the privacy of the locker room and take time to discuss the events of the first half. The officials can also use that time to refocus and concentrate on making the second half of the game even better. How many times have you heard before taking the court, “That was the easy half.”

While there are many things a crew may cover at halftime, three topics should always come up:

1. What plays stood out in the first half? Were those plays handled correctly, or could they be improved upon? Perhaps there was a block/charge call that was very close or a three-point attempt that could have been more effectively covered. (Officials in the professional leagues even have the technology to watch a play from the previous half right there in the lockerroom.) Discuss the type of offenses involved and how those might affect crew positioning. Understand the defenses being used and how those might relate to the tempo of the game. Halftime is a great time to discuss plays. It is not, however, a time for argument. Any discussion that isn’t positioned in helping the crew improve should be eliminated. Save it for after the game.

2. Are there any players or coaches that deserve attention in the second half? Perhaps one of the crew members has spoken to a coach or a player about something, but hasn’t had the chance to tell the rest of the crew. Now is the time to do it. If there is a particular match-up between players that is closely contested, the crew should be aware of it for the second half. Talk about the demeanor of the players and coaches, how it may change and how the crew will handle such a situation.

3. What might the second half hold in store? If the game is close, and you expect a barnburner, make sure everyone in the crew stays focused and reviews rules regarding overtime. Games in which the margin is larger require particular focus and attention. The crew should discuss what is expected in the second half and make sure that everyone is focused and prepared.

Don’t let a well-timed cheap shot catch your crew offguard in the waning moments of a blowout.

If a crew can thoroughly cover at least those three topics in their halftime conference, the chance for success in the game increases greatly. Hopefully, the crew held a thorough pregame, and will do the necessary postgame analysis as well. A thorough halftime conference, however, is the best chance a crew has to address issues during the game, when it may matter most.

Written by Daniel Rothamel, Palmyra, Va., who officiates high school and college basketball.

Referee Magazine(This article was published in the 04/07 issue of Referee Magazine.)

Basketball – 5 Minutes with Karen Preato

5-minutes-with-KAREN-PREATO

Hometown: Greensboro, N.C.

Experience: Started officiating at the college level in 1998 and entered the D-I ranks in 2003. Currently works in the Atlantic 10, Atlantic Coast, Atlantic Sun, American Athletic, Big East, Big South, Conference USA, Colonial, Patriot and Southern


REFEREE:
True or false? Double whistles are bad.

PREATO: False. When it is points of intersection, it’s a confirmation that the officials have the same call. We’re tuned in to own our primary and call our primary. If you want to come fishing all the way over from the trail into the C’s area, come on over, but you’re responsible for that. But I can make that call. When you have areas of intersection, you have a quick second on the court. You can’t look at the floor and say, “Oh, is that the lead’s or is that mine?” I think it’s instinct that you know where the play is, that you understand that it’s an area of intersection. You’re going to have a double whistle at times.

REFEREE: What effect does trusting the system and your partners play?

PREATO: It kind of goes back to fishing in the pond. It’s a regular job. People go to work as accountants, as doctors, as dentists, they have a job to do. So do officials. I know that if I’m in my area and you’re in the C, I’m in the trail. I know you have a job to do and you’re going to do it. The reason why you may not do something is because you couldn’t see it. Or there’s been times when a player pushes an official while chasing a loose ball, and all of a sudden it’s an obvious foul. I now know I need to go and help. So I trust him or her to give that official the opportunity, but I’m doing what’s best for the game. It’s not for the official, it’s for the players. It’s the right call. Trust your partners and work the system; plays are going to call themselves. Sometimes the official just can’t get to where he or she needs to be and somebody else can see it better.

REFEREE: What are common areas for double whistles to occur?

PREATO: The free-throw line, transition, screens, sometimes the top of the key when you’ve got the screen coming off the dribbler, maybe leaving the trail going to the C, and on a screen down in the blocks, the paint.

REFEREE: Art versus science. Can it be all science?

PREATO: You cannot get every play. You can’t. People put plays up and they say they want that called. OK, I can do that. Well, sometimes it is different when you’re on the floor. Sometimes you think you have the right call on the floor and you go back and you’re like, “Oh, we missed that little hold first. We couldn’t see this, but we could see everything else.” Is it really the art or science? You can’t get there. We joke about if they put robots on the floor and every time they see it, bam, bam, bam. You can just sit up in the stands, like video. Foul, foul, foul, foul.

REFEREE: What is more important: play-calling, mechanics or rules knowledge?

PREATO: Most definitely rules. I need to know what was illegal about the contact or the violation that I just put a whistle on, because now I’m penalizing the team for a violation or I’m penalizing a player and giving them a foul. I need to know if they established legal guarding position to draw that charge. Were they vertical to block a shot? Did they come through the shooter? I need to understand the definitions or the rules in order to enforce what I’m calling on the floor. If I call a push on the spot and now I come to the table and I report a hit, that’s bad mechanics, right? Now the coach can say to me, “Karen, what did you really see on that play? You called a push. At the table you just said you got a hit.” I’ll say, “Well Coach, she pushed.” I think sometimes we all get caught up in mechanics. We might have forgotten to close our fist for a foul. But I can give them the rule interpretation of what I called on the floor. Most of the time coaches see the play. They know how that girl got to that floor when it’s obvious. When there’s a questionable one, that’s when knowing the rules or applying the definition of why you’re calling a foul is important.

Referee Magazine(This article was published in the 06/15 issue of Referee Magazine.)

Basketball – 5 Minutes with J.D. Collins

Getting to know the new NCAA men’s national coordinator.

Header

Hometown: Hartford City, Ind.

Experience: NCAA national coordinator of men’s basketball officiating; former coordinator of officials for the Mid-American Conference and Summit League; former consultant to the Big Ten Conference; former D-I official for nearly two decades, including two Final Fours. Suffered career-ending injury in 2009-10 season; worked in seven conferences.

REFEREE: How would you describe the current state of officiating?

COLLINS: Across the country we have quality officials doing great work, night in and night out. That gets overlooked. Our missed-call ratio or our accuracy of calls, is extremely high. One play in one game can get a lot of attention, but our officials across the country are doing a great job. I’ve stood in the shoes they stand in. I know how difficult it is to do their job, and they deserve to be credited with doing some outstanding work.

Referee: Block-charge plays continue to be in the headlines. What can be done to increase the accuracy, and does the accuracy change from lead, center and trail when called from those respective spots on the floor?

collins: That’s a chicken and the egg question there. First, on any play, you have to be in the right position to make the call. If the play is coming down the paint, going to the rim, and the lead is in the proper position and has a good angle between the players, he should be able to assess whether the defender is legal prior to that crash happening. The reality is that the center official is straightlined with the defender. Can he see left movement of three to four inches? In that play, the center may not have the best look and the lead needs to address it. Positioning is the key, knowing who the primary is. Overall, one of the things that we overlook is when we’ve got crashes and bodies down, we need to seriously consider having calls. Too many times there are crashes, bodies on the floor, we don’t address the play, and then the game itself gets more physical.

Is there empirical data that says we’re missing block-charge plays? Because I’ve had access that says we’re doing a pretty good job of getting the block-charge plays right. If there’s empirical data out there that says our accuracy isn’t high enough, then we need to address that. But if we’re getting an acceptable rate, then maybe there are other plays that deserve more attention. Are we dealing with a perception that block-charge plays are not correct or are we dealing with reality and the empirical data that says we are or are not? In my infancy at this position, I don’t know that answer.

Referee: What will be your immediate areas of focus relating to mechanics and positioning?

collins: I’m a little hesitant to jump quickly, but what I will say is we need to do a better job overall in stopping the clock on every play, and communicating effectively. Once we blow our whistle on a play, the judgment portion of our officiating is done, and we become communicators. What we’re communicating to the table, to the players, coaches, fellow officials, has to be clear, has to be understandable and can’t just be my favorite signal I use every time. At that point we’re communicating a message, and it needs to be done with a purpose. Stopping the clock on every play will make us better. It will make us slow down and see if our partner has something different, see if our partner even has a call. Slowing down just a touch so that we keep ourselves out of the soup. Stopping the clock on every play is still in the mechanics book, and we will utilize it. That will be an adjustment that many of our officials across the nation will need to adhere to. It’s not that hard. It’s how we began officiating, and we just simply got away from it. That will be a focus of mine. It may be a pretty minor focus, but at the same time I think it’s really important to make us better officials.

Referee Magazine(This article was published in the 08/15 issue of Referee Magazine.)

Basketball – Clean Up the Screen

We’ve seen the play a multitude of times. The ballhandler is dribbling up the court when a screener sets a blind screen on a moving opponent and huge collision occurs. Every person in the place sees the collision and an exasperated gasp comes over the gymnasium. Was it legal or was it a foul?

To understand the impact of the play, officials have to not only watch the defender, but also have to watch the screener to determine position. In PlayPic A, Number 15 has approached the play to set a ball screen for the dribbler. The defender is unaware of a potential screen and is moving in an attempt to continue a closely guarded count on the dribbler. In PlayPic B, the collision occurs. A blocking foul (illegal screen) has to be whistled on number 15, who has moved into the path of a moving opponent (number 10) and it is too late for that opponent to stop or change direction. To set a screen on a moving opponent, the same principles on distance apply as when an initial guarding position is taken on a moving opponent without the ball. The opponent must be able to stop or change direction. If ample room or space is given, and number 15 had come to a complete stop in position, any contact would be ignored (or possibly ruled a foul on the defender).

Also notice the position of the feet of the screener. The NCAA enacted a rule this season that states the normal stance of the screener shall be approximately shoulder width (NCAA 4-57). In PlayPic B, clearly number 15 has his legs too far apart, greater than the width of his shoulders.

It can be very difficult for the official on the ball to officiate this play. Primary coverage is on the ballhandler and opponent and all of the sudden a huge collision has occurred. The off-ball official(s) will have the best chance at locating the screener and determining the screener’s position to know whether or not the screen was legal.

basketball-Clean-Up-the-Screen

Referee Magazine(This article was published in the 04/07 issue of Referee Magazine.)

Basketball – Granting Timeouts

Basketball---Granting-Timeouts

A point of emphasis this year in the NFHS revolves around the proper granting of timeouts. In the PlayPic, team A has just scored a basket and team B has the ball at its disposal for the ensuing throw-in. It is too late to grant a timeout to team A in that scenario. Team A may request and be granted a timeout only until the ensuing throw-in begins.

The throw-in begins when a player from team B has the ball at his/her disposal and the official has begun the five second count as shown. Be cognizant of coaches wanting to call timeouts, but don’t grant it to a team not in control of the ball if the request comes too late.

Referee Magazine(This article was published in the 02/07 issue of Referee Magazine.)

Basketball – Five Minutes With Karen Preato

Five-Minutes-with-Karen-Preato

Hometown: Greensboro, N.C.

Experience:
Started officiating at the college level in 1998 and entered the D-I ranks in 2003. Currently works in the Atlantic 10, Atlantic Coast, Atlantic Sun, American Athletic, Big East, Big South, Conference USA, Colonial, Patriot and Southern conferences.


REFEREE: True or false? Double whistles are bad.

PREATO: False. When it is points of intersection, it’s a confirmation that the officials have the same call. We’re tuned in to own our primary and call our primary. If you want to come fishing all the way over from the trail into the C’s area, come on over, but you’re responsible for that. But I can make that call. When you have areas of intersection, you have a quick second on the court. You can’t look at the floor and say, “Oh, is that the lead’s or is that mine?” I think it’s instinct that you know where the play is, that you understand that it’s an area of intersection. You’re going to have a double whistle at times.

REFEREE: What effect does trusting the system and your partners play?

PREATO: It kind of goes back to fishing in the pond. It’s a regular job. People go to work as accountants, as doctors, as dentists, they have a job to do. So do officials. I know that if I’m in my area and you’re in the C, I’m in the trail. I know you have a job to do and you’re going to do it. The reason why you may not do something is because you couldn’t see it. Or there’s been times when a player pushes an official while chasing a loose ball, and all of a sudden it’s an obvious foul. I now know I need to go and help. So I trust him or her to give that official the opportunity, but I’m doing what’s best for the game. It’s not for the official, it’s for the players. It’s the right call. Trust your partners and work the system; plays are going to call themselves. Sometimes the official just can’t get to where he or she needs to be and somebody else can see it better.

REFEREE: What are common areas for double whistles to occur?

PREATO: The free-throw line, transition, screens, sometimes the top of the key when you’ve got the screen coming off the dribbler, maybe leaving the trail going to the C, and on a screen down in the blocks, the paint.

REFEREE: Art versus science. Can it be all science?

PREATO: You cannot get every play. You can’t. People put plays up and they say they want that called. OK, I can do that. Well, sometimes it is different when you’re on the floor. Sometimes you think you have the right call on the floor and you go back and you’re like, “Oh, we missed that little hold first. We couldn’t see this, but we could see everything else.” Is it really the art or science? You can’t get there. We joke about if they put robots on the floor and every time they see it, bam, bam, bam. You can just sit up in the stands, like video. Foul, foul, foul, foul.

REFEREE: What is more important: play-calling, mechanics or rules knowledge?

PREATO: Most definitely rules. I need to know what was illegal about the contact or the violation that I just put a whistle on, because now I’m penalizing the team for a violation or I’m penalizing a player and giving them a foul. I need to know if they established legal guarding position to draw that charge. Were they vertical to block a shot? Did they come through the shooter? I need to understand the definitions or the rules in order to enforce what I’m calling on the floor. If I call a push on the spot and now I come to the table and I report a hit, that’s bad mechanics, right? Now the coach can say to me, “Karen, what did you really see on that play? You called a push. At the table you just said you got a hit.” I’ll say, “Well Coach, she pushed.” I think sometimes we all get caught up in mechanics. We might have forgotten to close our fist for a foul. But I can give them the rule interpretation of what I called on the floor. Most of the time coaches see the play. They know how that girl got to that floor when it’s obvious. When there’s a questionable one, that’s when knowing the rules or applying the definition of why you’re calling a foul is important.

Basketball – Five Minutes With JD Collins

Getting to know the new NCAA men’s national coordinator.

Five-Minutes-with-JD-Collins

Hometown: Hartford City, Ind.

Experience: NCAA national coordinator of men’s basketball officiating; former coordinator of officials for the Mid-American Conference and Summit League; former consultant to the Big Ten Conference; former D-I official for nearly two decades, including two Final Fours. Suffered career-ending injury in 2009-10 season; worked in seven conferences.


REFEREE: How would you describe the current state of officiating?

COLLINS: Across the country we have quality officials doing great work, night in and night out. That gets overlooked. Our missed-call ratio or our accuracy of calls, is extremely high. One play in one game can get a lot of attention, but our officials across the country are doing a great job. I’ve stood in the shoes they stand in. I know how difficult it is to do their job, and they deserve to be credited with doing some outstanding work.

REFEREE: Block-charge plays continue to be in the headlines. What can be done to increase the accuracy, and does the accuracy change from lead, center and trail when called from those respective spots on the floor?

COLLINS: That’s a chicken and the egg question there. First, on any play, you have to be in the right position to make the call. If the play is coming down the paint, going to the rim, and the lead is in the proper position and has a good angle between the players, he should be able to assess whether the defender is legal prior to that crash happening. The reality is that the center official is straightlined with the defender. Can he see left movement of three to four inches? In that play, the center may not have the best look and the lead needs to address it. Positioning is the key, knowing who the primary is. Overall, one of the things that we overlook is when we’ve got crashes and bodies down, we need to seriously consider having calls. Too many times there are crashes, bodies on the floor, we don’t address the play, and then the game itself gets more physical.

Is there empirical data that says we’re missing block-charge plays? Because I’ve had access that says we’re doing a pretty good job of getting the block-charge plays right. If there’s empirical data out there that says our accuracy isn’t high enough, then we need to address that. But if we’re getting an acceptable rate, then maybe there are other plays that deserve more attention. Are we dealing with a perception that block-charge plays are not correct or are we dealing with reality and the empirical data that says we are or are not? In my infancy at this position, I don’t know that answer.

REFEREE:What will be your immediate areas of focus relating to mechanics and positioning?

COLLINS: I’m a little hesitant to jump quickly, but what I will say is we need to do a better job overall in stopping the clock on every play, and communicating effectively. Once we blow our whistle on a play, the judgment portion of our officiating is done, and we become communicators. What we’re communicating to the table, to the players, coaches, fellow officials, has to be clear, has to be understandable and can’t just be my favorite signal I use every time. At that point we’re communicating a message, and it needs to be done with a purpose. Stopping the clock on every play will make us better. It will make us slow down and see if our partner has something different, see if our partner even has a call. Slowing down just a touch so that we keep ourselves out of the soup. Stopping the clock on every play is still in the mechanics book, and we will utilize it. That will be an adjustment that many of our officials across the nation will need to adhere to. It’s not that hard. It’s how we began officiating, and we just simply got away from it. That will be a focus of mine. It may be a pretty minor focus, but at the same time I think it’s really important to make us better officials. 

 

Referee Magazine(This article was published in the 08/15 issue of Referee Magazine.)

Basketball – 2015-16 Men’s Basketball Rules Changes

ncaaThe NCAA Men’s Basketball Rules Committee made more than 25 rules changes, most of which increase the pace of play, reduce the number of stoppages and provide better balance between offense and defense.

The Men’s Basketball Rules Committee also issued a directive, supported by the NABC Board and the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Oversight Committee, to the officiating community to reduce physicality in order to create freedom of movement specifically in the following areas:

• Hand checking/body bumping the ball handler. (Rule 10-1.4)

• Physical post play and rebounding.

• Freedom of movement for players without the ball – cutters.

• Screening – stationary screens required.

• Offense initiated contact with legal defenders.

Key Rule Changes

• Shot clock reduced from 35 seconds to 30 seconds. (Rule 9-11.3)

• Restricted area arc expanded from three feet to four feet. (Rule 1-8)

• Timeouts:

  1. • Reduction of 30-second timeouts from four to three; only two carry over to the second half. (Rule 5-14.10.e)
  2. A 30-second timeout called within 30 seconds of a media timeout will become the media timeout. (Rule 5-14.10.e)
  3. Coaches can only call timeouts during a dead ball situation. (Rule 5-14.1.c)

• The 10-second backcourt count resets except when:

  1. Defender causes the ball to go out of bounds;
  2. Offense retains possession on a held ball; or
  3. A technical foul is called on the offensive team.

Note: A charged timeout by the offensive team results in a new 10-second count.

• Removed the five-second closely guarded count on a dribble. (Rule 9-14.2)

• Guarding in the post: Arm bar allowed in post area when offense has back to the basket with or without ball.

(Rule 10-1.5)

• Airborne shooter charge plays – cannot score basket; player-control foul. (Rule 4-15.2.c.1)

• Removed the prohibition against dunking the ball while the ball is dead; teams will be allowed to dunk during pregame and halftime. (Rule 10-4.1.e)

• Guarding exception: When a defensive player is clearly not going to contact a jump shooter (fly by), the offensive player cannot “seek out” the defender. ( Rules 4-17.4 and 4-17.6 and A.R. 89)

• Faking being fouled: Officials can penalize a player for faking being fouled only when the officials are conducting monitor review for a flagrant foul. The penalty is a Class A technical foul, two shots and the ball put in play at the point of interruption. (Rule 10-3.1.d)

• Class B technical foul and administrative technical foul penalties reduced to one shot and the ball put in play at the point of interruption. (Rules 10-2 and 10-4)

• Causing a delay following team huddles will result in a Class B technical foul. A warning will be issued for the following before a penalty is applied. (Rule 10-4.2.g)

  1. Disqualified player.
  2. Injured player.
  3. End of a timeout.

• Reduced time to 15 seconds for replacing disqualified players. (Rule 2-10.9)

• Instant replay:

  1. Officials will use 0.00 on the shot clock to determine violations. (Rule 11-1.3)
  2. Officials will be able to look at the release of the ball on potential shot clock violations at any point during the game for made baskets only. (Rule 11-2.1.b)
  3. During all instant replay reviews in the last two minutes of the second half and the last two minutes of overtime(s), substitutions or timeouts will not be permitted until the results of the instant replay review have been reported to both coaches. (Rule 11-2.1.e and Rule 3-2.1.i)

Please note that this document is not meant to be all-inclusive. For a complete listing of all of the men’s basketball rules, please visit www.ncaa.com/publications. For questions on these rules/directives/interpretations, please contact J.D. Collins, NCAA National Coordinator of Men’s Basketball Officiating: jdcollinsref@yahoo.com.

Basketball – Two-Minute Workout

Athletic-man-running-with-music

Here is an example of a two-minute basketball-specific sequence, mentioned in the 7/15 issue of Referee, that you could incorporate in your workout routine:

• Start on the endline and sprint down the court to the opposite trail position.

• Initiate a closely guarded count.

• At four seconds indicate a three-point attempt and score the goal.

• Sprint back to the opposite endline as the new lead.

• Move to close down.

• Initiate a rotation.

• Sprint to opposite trail position.

• Initiate a closely guarded count.

• At four seconds indicate three-point attempt.

• Score the goal.

• Sprint to opposite endline.

• Move to close down.

• Initiate a rotation.

• Sprint to opposite trail position.

• Rotate to the center position.

• Indicate a three-point attempt.

• Score the goal.

• Sprint to opposite center position.

• Indicate a three-point attempt.

• Score the goal.

Try to complete that cycle in less than two minutes. Don’t wait. Do it now.

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