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These 7 tips give officials helpful hints on how to be a good roommate when sharing a room at a camp or tournament.

1.

Figure out who is getting up first. Some people take an hour to get ready in the morning. Others may take only 10 minutes. If your roommate is waiting to get in after you, get dressed outside the bathroom and don’t use all the hot water.

2.

Choose the bed to sleep in with honor. Some people prefer being closer to the window or the AC/heater, while others want to be near the bathroom. Work it out fairly and if all else fails, there is always rock, paper, scissors.

3.

Figure out who is getting up first. Some people take an hour to get ready in the morning. Others may take only 10 minutes. If your roommate is waiting to get in after you, get dressed outside the bathroom and don’t use all the hot water.

4.

Do you snore? If so, is it like the cute sound of a kitten or like the roaring of a lion? Nothing is more aggravating than your roommate raising the roof off your room and sleeping soundly while you’re wide awake at 3 a.m. covering your ears. Give your roomie advance warning so he or she can bring earplugs.

5.

Can you sleep with the TV on? How about the lights? Are you a bat that requires total darkness in order to get your beauty rest? Both of you will need a good night’s sleep. Find out any specific things your roommate needs so he or she is fresh the next day.

6.

Hot or cold? We all have different thermal comfort levels in a room. Decide on a happy medium for the air temperature. If one person is sleeping on top of the sheets while the other is buried under two blankets with their teeth chattering, well …

7.

Talk to your roommate. You might be lucky enough to have a roommate from a different part of the country or from a different community. You may learn a new officiating tip. Perhaps they have an interesting job, or they’re retired. Talk.

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